Difference between revisions of "David Brandenburg"

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=Armorial Bearings=
 
=Armorial Bearings=
[[File:Wappen Mark Brandenburg.png|left|thumb|145px|Margraviate of Brandenburg Coat of Arms.]]
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[[File:Wappen Mark Brandenburg.png|left|thumb|100px|Margraviate of Brandenburg Coat of Arms.]]
[[File:Hohenzollern Brandenburg.png|left|thumb|145px|Coat of Arms of the Brandenburg Hohenzollern Princes.]]
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[[File:Hohenzollern Brandenburg.png|left|thumb|100px|Coat of Arms of the Brandenburg Hohenzollern Princes.]]
 
[[File:State-meck-brand.png|right|thumb|260px|Brandenburg Margraviate in the Kingdom of Prussia]]
 
[[File:State-meck-brand.png|right|thumb|260px|Brandenburg Margraviate in the Kingdom of Prussia]]
 
Armorial bearings are also known colloquially as a [[Coat of Arms]]. They are the principal part of a system of hereditary symbols dating back to early medieval Europe, used primarily to establish identity in battle.<ref name="Woodstock"/><ref name="Fox"/>They are still used today by royalty, nobility and knights to cover, protect, and identify the wearer; to denote their decedents, property ownership and their profession.<ref name="Woodstock">Woodcock, T., & Robinson, J. M. (1988). The Oxford guide to heraldry (Vol. 116). Oxford University Press.</ref><ref name="Fox"> Fox-Davies, A. C. (2007). A complete guide to heraldry. Skyhorse Publishing Inc.</ref> In the Kingdom of Prussia Armorial Bearings belonged to specific individuals and their families which was a huge shift from Heraldic tradition in the United Kingdom and other Heraldic Authorities. According to tradition, the Märkischer Adler ('Marcher eagle'), or red eagle of the March of Brandenburg, was adopted by Margrave Gero in the 10th century. Gustav A. Seyler states that the Ascanian Albert the Bear was the originator.<ref>Siebmacher, J. (1973). J. Siebmacher's Grosses Wappenbuch: Die Wappen des preussischen Adel,(T. 1-3) (Vol. 14). Bauer & Raspe.</ref> He divided his territory among his children, thereby creating the territories which would later become Anhalt, Brandenburg, and Meissen.  
 
Armorial bearings are also known colloquially as a [[Coat of Arms]]. They are the principal part of a system of hereditary symbols dating back to early medieval Europe, used primarily to establish identity in battle.<ref name="Woodstock"/><ref name="Fox"/>They are still used today by royalty, nobility and knights to cover, protect, and identify the wearer; to denote their decedents, property ownership and their profession.<ref name="Woodstock">Woodcock, T., & Robinson, J. M. (1988). The Oxford guide to heraldry (Vol. 116). Oxford University Press.</ref><ref name="Fox"> Fox-Davies, A. C. (2007). A complete guide to heraldry. Skyhorse Publishing Inc.</ref> In the Kingdom of Prussia Armorial Bearings belonged to specific individuals and their families which was a huge shift from Heraldic tradition in the United Kingdom and other Heraldic Authorities. According to tradition, the Märkischer Adler ('Marcher eagle'), or red eagle of the March of Brandenburg, was adopted by Margrave Gero in the 10th century. Gustav A. Seyler states that the Ascanian Albert the Bear was the originator.<ref>Siebmacher, J. (1973). J. Siebmacher's Grosses Wappenbuch: Die Wappen des preussischen Adel,(T. 1-3) (Vol. 14). Bauer & Raspe.</ref> He divided his territory among his children, thereby creating the territories which would later become Anhalt, Brandenburg, and Meissen.  

Latest revision as of 07:33, 9 July 2019

David Brandenburg
1354504d-7efd-4ef7-96bb-a2ed80566a45.jpg
David Brandenburg
Born07 January 1812
Hardin, Kentucky, United States
Died18 September 1874
Oaktown, Knox County, Indiana, United States
BurialCharley Cemetery, Knox County, Indiana, United States
WifeLaura Jane Beard
IssueSusan brandenburg
Amy Anna Brandenburg
Margaret Brandenburg
Addie Alice Brandenburg
Martha Jane Brandenburg
louisa Jane Brandenburg
Mary Catherine Brandenburg
Francis Marion Brandenburg
John Lopp Brandenburg
RoyaltyHouse of Hohenzollern
FatherJohnathan Brandenburg
MotherAmy Anne Jenkins
ReligionProtestant
OccupationSoldier, Rancher

David Brandenburg was the son of Johnathan Brandenburg (1775-1854) by his wife Amy Anne Jenkins (1783-1858). He was born on 04 October 1812 in Hardin, Kentucky, United States. He married Laura Jane Beard, daughter of Peter Beard (1791–1860) by this wife Susannah Olman (1795–1859) on 01 February 1834 and had nine children by that marriage.[1] He was a member of the Royal Family of Brandenburg of House of Hohenzollern in the Kingdom of Prussia.

Armorial Bearings

Margraviate of Brandenburg Coat of Arms.
Coat of Arms of the Brandenburg Hohenzollern Princes.
Brandenburg Margraviate in the Kingdom of Prussia

Armorial bearings are also known colloquially as a Coat of Arms. They are the principal part of a system of hereditary symbols dating back to early medieval Europe, used primarily to establish identity in battle.[2][3]They are still used today by royalty, nobility and knights to cover, protect, and identify the wearer; to denote their decedents, property ownership and their profession.[2][3] In the Kingdom of Prussia Armorial Bearings belonged to specific individuals and their families which was a huge shift from Heraldic tradition in the United Kingdom and other Heraldic Authorities. According to tradition, the Märkischer Adler ('Marcher eagle'), or red eagle of the March of Brandenburg, was adopted by Margrave Gero in the 10th century. Gustav A. Seyler states that the Ascanian Albert the Bear was the originator.[4] He divided his territory among his children, thereby creating the territories which would later become Anhalt, Brandenburg, and Meissen.

The March of Brandenburg, known as the Holy Roman Empire's 'sandbox' (Streusandbüchse), was granted in 1415 to Burggrave Frederick VI of Nuremberg of the House of Hohenzollern. Over the centuries, the Hohenzollerns made these poor marshes and woodlands the nucleus of a powerful state. After being formally enfeoffed as Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg, he quartered the arms of Hohenzollern (quarterly sable and argent) and the burgraviate of Nuremberg (Or, a lion sable within a border compony gules and argent) with the Brandenburg red eagle. The blue escutcheon with the golden sceptre, as symbol of the office of archchamberlain (Erzkämmerer) of the Empire, was added under Frederick II (1440-70). In 1417 Friedrich VI of Hohenzollern, Count of Nürnberg, was appointed Margrave of Brandenburg on the Concilium of Konstanz by Emperor Sigismund. The Emperor also gave him a sceptre as a symbol for his new territory. He used this sceptre in his personal arms in gold on blue, but it was not used widely in the arms of the territory itself. Only in 1864 the sceptre was added as a breast-shield on the eagle.

Military Service

American Civil War Campaign Medal

David Brandenburg enlisted in Company F, Indiana 81st Infantry Regiment on 16 Aug 1862. Mustered out on 08 Jun 1863.[5] The regiment lost a total of 245 men during service; 4 officers and 52 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 1 officer and 188 enlisted men died of disease.

The Tullahoma Campaign

This campaign was a military operation conducted from June 24 to July 3, 1863, by the Union Army of the Cumberland under Major General William Rosecrans, and regarded as one of the most brilliant maneuvers of the American Civil War. Its effect was to drive the Confederates out of Middle Tennessee and to threaten the strategic city of Chattanooga.[6]

The Chickamauga Campaign

This was a series of battles fought in northwestern Georgia from August 21 to September 20, 1863, between the Union Army of the Cumberland and Confederate Army of Tennessee. The campaign started successfully for Union commander William S. Rosecrans, with the Union army occupying the vital city of Chattanooga and forcing the Confederates to retreat into northern Georgia. But a Confederate attack at the Battle of Chickamauga forced Rosecrans to retreat back into Chattanooga and allowed the Confederates to lay siege to the Union forces.[7][8]

Atlanta Campaign

The Atlanta Campaign was a series of battles fought in the Western Theater of the American Civil War throughout northwest Georgia and the area around Atlanta during the summer of 1864. Union Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman invaded Georgia from the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tennessee, beginning in May 1864, opposed by the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston.

Family

David Brandenburg married Laura Jane Beard, daughter of Peter Beard (1791–1860) by this wife Susannah Olman (1795–1859), and had nine children by that marriage.

  • Susan brandenburg
  • Amy Anna Brandenburg
  • Margaret Brandenburg
  • Addie Alice Brandenburg
  • Martha Jane Brandenburg
  • Louisa Jane Brandenburg
  • Mary Catherine Brandenburg
  • Francis Marion Brandenburg
  • John Lopp Brandenburg

David Brandenburg died on 18 September 1874 in Oaktown, Knox County, Indiana, United States and is buried at Charley Cemetery, Knox County, Indiana, United States.

References

  1. Indiana, Compiled Marriages, 1802-1850. Dodd, Jordan, comp.. Indiana Marriages to 1850. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Indiana.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Woodcock, T., & Robinson, J. M. (1988). The Oxford guide to heraldry (Vol. 116). Oxford University Press.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Fox-Davies, A. C. (2007). A complete guide to heraldry. Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
  4. Siebmacher, J. (1973). J. Siebmacher's Grosses Wappenbuch: Die Wappen des preussischen Adel,(T. 1-3) (Vol. 14). Bauer & Raspe.
  5. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Card Records of Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, ca. 1879-ca. 1903; NAI Number: 616171; Record Group: Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General; Record Group Number: 92; Series Number: M1845; Roll: 3
  6. Connolly, James A. Three Years in the Army of the Cumberland: The Letters and Diary of Major James A. Connolly. Edited by Paul M. Angle. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996. ISBN 0-253-21073-9. First published 1959.
  7. Stacey, C. (2011). The Chickamauga Campaign. Civil War History, 57(4), 420-421.
  8. Abbazia, P. (1988). The Chickamauga campaign, December 1862-November 1863. Gallery Books.