Difference between revisions of "Johnathan Brandenburg"

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[[File:Wappen Mark Brandenburg.png|left|thumb|150px| Coat of Arms Margraviate of Brandenburg]]
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[[File:Wappen Mark Brandenburg.png|left|thumb|100px| Coat of Arms Margraviate of Brandenburg]]
[[File:Wappen Preußen.png|left|thumb|150px|Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Prussia]]
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[[File:Wappen Preußen.png|left|thumb|100px|Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Prussia]]
 
[[File:State-meck-brand.png|right|thumb|260px|Brandenburg Margraviate in the Kingdom of Prussia]]
 
[[File:State-meck-brand.png|right|thumb|260px|Brandenburg Margraviate in the Kingdom of Prussia]]
 
rmorial bearings are also known colloquially as a [[Coat of Arms]]. They are the principal part of a system of hereditary symbols dating back to early medieval Europe, used primarily to establish identity in battle.<ref name="Woodstock"/><ref name="Fox"/>They are still used today by royalty, nobility and knights to cover, protect, and identify the wearer; to denote their decedents, property ownership and their profession.<ref name="Woodstock">Woodcock, T., & Robinson, J. M. (1988). The Oxford guide to heraldry (Vol. 116). Oxford University Press.</ref><ref name="Fox"> Fox-Davies, A. C. (2007). A complete guide to heraldry. Skyhorse Publishing Inc.</ref> In the Kingdom of Prussia Armorial Bearings belonged to specific individuals and their families which was a huge shift from Heraldic tradition in the United Kingdom and other Heraldic Authorities. According to tradition, the Märkischer Adler ('Marcher eagle'), or red eagle of the March of Brandenburg, was adopted by Margrave Gero in the 10th century. Gustav A. Seyler states that the Ascanian Albert the Bear was the originator.<ref>Siebmacher, J. (1973). J. Siebmacher's Grosses Wappenbuch: Die Wappen des preussischen Adel,(T. 1-3) (Vol. 14). Bauer & Raspe.</ref> He divided his territory among his children, thereby creating the territories which would later become Anhalt, Brandenburg, and Meissen.  
 
rmorial bearings are also known colloquially as a [[Coat of Arms]]. They are the principal part of a system of hereditary symbols dating back to early medieval Europe, used primarily to establish identity in battle.<ref name="Woodstock"/><ref name="Fox"/>They are still used today by royalty, nobility and knights to cover, protect, and identify the wearer; to denote their decedents, property ownership and their profession.<ref name="Woodstock">Woodcock, T., & Robinson, J. M. (1988). The Oxford guide to heraldry (Vol. 116). Oxford University Press.</ref><ref name="Fox"> Fox-Davies, A. C. (2007). A complete guide to heraldry. Skyhorse Publishing Inc.</ref> In the Kingdom of Prussia Armorial Bearings belonged to specific individuals and their families which was a huge shift from Heraldic tradition in the United Kingdom and other Heraldic Authorities. According to tradition, the Märkischer Adler ('Marcher eagle'), or red eagle of the March of Brandenburg, was adopted by Margrave Gero in the 10th century. Gustav A. Seyler states that the Ascanian Albert the Bear was the originator.<ref>Siebmacher, J. (1973). J. Siebmacher's Grosses Wappenbuch: Die Wappen des preussischen Adel,(T. 1-3) (Vol. 14). Bauer & Raspe.</ref> He divided his territory among his children, thereby creating the territories which would later become Anhalt, Brandenburg, and Meissen.  

Latest revision as of 07:34, 9 July 2019

Johnathan Brandenburg
Hohenzollern Brandenburg.png
Coat of Arms of the Brandenburg Hohenzollern Princes
Born12 April 1775
Westchester, Hampshire County, Virginia, United States
Died16 July 1854
Mauckport, Harrison County, Indiana, United States
WifeAmy Anne Jenkins
IssueDavid Brandenburg
Ruth Anne Brandenburg
Joseph Brandenburg
RoyaltyHouse of Hohenzollern
FatherMatthias Brandenburg
MotherEsther Wulgemacht
ReligionProtestant

Johnathan Brandenburg was the son of Matthias Brandenburg by his wife Esther Wulgemacht (1744-1821). He was born in 1775 in the British Colony of Maryland. He was a member of the Royal Family of Brandenburg in the Kingdom of Prussia and lived most of his life oblivious that he was a member of a European Royal Family until his father's dying confession. He married a commoner whilst in exile in the United States and had at least three children by that marriage

Armorial Bearings

Coat of Arms Margraviate of Brandenburg
Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Prussia
Brandenburg Margraviate in the Kingdom of Prussia

rmorial bearings are also known colloquially as a Coat of Arms. They are the principal part of a system of hereditary symbols dating back to early medieval Europe, used primarily to establish identity in battle.[1][2]They are still used today by royalty, nobility and knights to cover, protect, and identify the wearer; to denote their decedents, property ownership and their profession.[1][2] In the Kingdom of Prussia Armorial Bearings belonged to specific individuals and their families which was a huge shift from Heraldic tradition in the United Kingdom and other Heraldic Authorities. According to tradition, the Märkischer Adler ('Marcher eagle'), or red eagle of the March of Brandenburg, was adopted by Margrave Gero in the 10th century. Gustav A. Seyler states that the Ascanian Albert the Bear was the originator.[3] He divided his territory among his children, thereby creating the territories which would later become Anhalt, Brandenburg, and Meissen.

The March of Brandenburg, known as the Holy Roman Empire's 'sandbox' (Streusandbüchse), was granted in 1415 to Burggrave Frederick VI of Nuremberg of the House of Hohenzollern. Over the centuries, the Hohenzollerns made these poor marshes and woodlands the nucleus of a powerful state. After being formally enfeoffed as Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg, he quartered the arms of Hohenzollern (quarterly sable and argent) and the burgraviate of Nuremberg (Or, a lion sable within a border compony gules and argent) with the Brandenburg red eagle. The blue escutcheon with the golden sceptre, as symbol of the office of archchamberlain (Erzkämmerer) of the Empire, was added under Frederick II (1440-70). In 1417 Friedrich VI of Hohenzollern, Count of Nürnberg, was appointed Margrave of Brandenburg on the Concilium of Konstanz by Emperor Sigismund. The Emperor also gave him a sceptre as a symbol for his new territory. He used this sceptre in his personal arms in gold on blue, but it was not used widely in the arms of the territory itself. Only in 1864 the sceptre was added as a breast-shield on the eagle.

Family

Johnathan Brandenburg married Amy Anne Jenkins (1782-1858), Daughter of Philip Jenkins (1748-1825) by his wife, on 4 Oct 1800 in Barren County, Kentucky, United States and had at least three children by that marriage.[4][5]

Johnathan Brandenburg died on 16 July 1854 in Mauckport, Harrison County, Indiana, United States.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Woodcock, T., & Robinson, J. M. (1988). The Oxford guide to heraldry (Vol. 116). Oxford University Press.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Fox-Davies, A. C. (2007). A complete guide to heraldry. Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
  3. Siebmacher, J. (1973). J. Siebmacher's Grosses Wappenbuch: Die Wappen des preussischen Adel,(T. 1-3) (Vol. 14). Bauer & Raspe.
  4. Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Source number: 5372.002; Source type: Family group sheet, FGSE, listed as parents; Number of Pages: 1
  5. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, "Ancestral File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:1:M7BD-KMG : accessed 2016-02-17), entry for Johnathan Brandenburg.